Social Distancing

Self-isolation looks different for everyone. Some of us live alone, some of us are working from home with a house full of kids, some even live with front line workers. Each situation comes with different challenges; loneliness, distractions, anxiety, etc. Due to their heightened risk of contracting COVID-19, those with disabilities may not get to see their loved ones. They may not understand why they cannot go to their regular activities or that their routines have been altered. This could result in increased behaviors, sadness, and sensory sensitivities. Here are some tips to handle some of these factors.

Staying Connected

For those living in group homes, supported living homes, and long-term care facilities, losing visiting hours means losing connection to family and friends. Phone calls are great, but nothing can compare to in-person human interaction. While you can’t bypass stay at home and social distancing orders, you can do things that are extra-special to stay connected. Video calls are more accessible than ever through smart phone apps, Zoom, Google and even social media platforms. If you have the means, setup regular calls with family and friends; play games, share a virtual meal or just have a chat. For those wanting to go the extra mile, send letters and/or care packages. Hand-written letters show extra care and give the recipients something to continue to read for comfort.

Staying Engaged & Active

It’s easy to get in the habit of watching Netflix and laying on the couch when you can’t leave the house (and a little bit of that is fine). However, for our mental and physical health, it’s important to find ways to continue some of the activities we love in our “normal” lives. As day services, camps and schools are canceled, the daily activities those of all abilities enjoy are on hold. The great news is, many organizations are still offering some activities online! You can get a workout with Turnstone if you check out their Facebook page (they are also providing other wellness activities daily). Every Thursday you can enjoy at-home theatre workshops, including shadow puppets, on the Fort Wayne Youtheatre YouTube page. Check out these activities suggested by YMCA of Greater Fort Wayne Adaptive Services. More traditionally, you can play games, take walks and take up new (and old) hobbies.

Staying Calm

Many feel more anxiety than usual right now, which is understandable. The best way to combat that is to stay informed. Everyone, even kids, hear about COVID-19 daily. Instead of shielding them from the information, help them learn the facts. Put the information into as simple of terms as necessary for their level of understanding. Ensure them that if everyone follows the rules, they will be safe. The Indiana Resource Center for Autism has great social narratives for situations from bathroom routines to schedule changes. Sometimes it’s also a good idea to just turn off the news.

We know that we missed many activities that those of all abilities can enjoy while social distancing. Let us know about them by tagging us on Facebook (@AWSFoundation) and we will share them as we can. Also know that there are resources to support your needs, Lutheran Social Services has an ongoing list. Follow the social distancing orders, wash your hands and find new ways to stay engaged.