Patti Hays, CEO

From the CEO: A Community that Celebrates People as They Are

My grandmother was born in 1891. When she went to the small Ohio schoolhouse her teacher observed her pick up the pencil with her left hand.  Each day thereafter her left hand was tied behind her back and she was forced to write with her right hand. Those who were left-handed were believed to be unlucky, dishonest, and even stupid. My grandmother was different and that was unacceptable.

How far we have come. Or have we? Now as in 1897, we all have confirmation bias. We search for and favor those like ourselves. Bypassing critical conscious thought, we are attracted to those who are similar. This is a field of expanding study with many corollaries but in that school in 1897, the girl who was left-handed was the one who was different and for that there was an attempt to correct her defect.

Ask anyone who is left-handed and they will tell you that they have had a lifetime of challenges. The world is built for the 90% of us who are right-handed. Scissors, desks, guitars, and even a computer mouse are all created for the right-hand dominant person. In my years of hiring, I am drawn to the lefties. I have found them to be more creative and better problem solvers because they have had to find new ways of doing things all their lives.

Overcoming confirmation bias is a continual process. It is only with repeated consistent and positive exposure to a diverse population that we can override those unconscious actions. It is more than just inviting everyone to the party. It is assuring that everyone feels respected and valued. That is the difference between diversity and inclusion.

The issues we deal with as a society today are not as simple as left or right handedness. Diversity today is different cultures, abilities, religions, sexual orientation, races, genders, and more. For some of us it is about us. For all of us it is around us.

Churchill said “The world, nature, human beings, do not move like machines. The edges are never clear-cut, but always frayed. Nature never draws a line without smudging it.” Are you the one who sees “different” as needing to be changed or ignored? Can you open yourself to greater exposure to that which is different with the goal of celebrating people as they are?